FIGHT FOR JOY IN THE MIDST OF SORROW

by Robert Dawson


Fight for Joy in the midst of Sorrow
Robert Dawson
Psalm 42-43


The great missionary Amy Carmichael said, ''Everywhere the perpetual endeavor of the enemy of souls is discouragement. If he can get the soul 'under the weather,' he wins.'' Perhaps, there is nothing that Satan uses any more to defeat a Christian than discouragement. Who among us has not been discouraged?

William Carey, the father of the modern mission movement was as faithful to call of God as any man I have read about. He never let anything stop him. He perservered in spite of all the hardships he encountered. As one writer said, ''He was no more deterred by tragedies than a locomotive by butterflies.'' Nonetheless, there were times when he suffered what one biographer called ''sheer black depression.''

Charles Spurgeon, often referred to as the Prince of Preachers, was so plagued by discouragement and depression that he tendered his resignation thirty-two times in thirty-nine years.

The saintly A.W.Tozer whose books still provides inspiration and benefit to the body of Christ, was not beyond discouragement. Erwin Lutzer, who knew him personally said, ''This man, who knew God so intimately, had days when he was so discouraged he felt he could not continue as a minister. A man who instructed thousands in the deep things of God often felt he was a miserable failure.''

Yes, we all have been discouraged. It may be there is a discouraged soul in this place today.

I want to draw your attention to Psalm 42 where we see the Psalmist deeply discouraged. As we look at the Psalm and the Psalmist, I believe there are truths that we can discover here that will help us in our times of discouragement.

SCRIPTURE - PSALM 42

As we read this psalm we become quickly and acutely aware that the writer of this psalm is struggling through one of the dark nights of the soul. His external circumstances are oppressive and his internal emotions are depressed.

1. (42.10) - His adversaries were sa ...

There are 13410 characters in the full content. This excerpt only shows a 2000 character sample of the full content.

Price:  $4.99 or 1 credit