Focus That Frees From Fear by Claude Thomas

Psalm 27

Introduction: He was a professional thief. He stirred fear like the desert wind stirs tumbleweeds. He terrorized the Wells Fargo Stage Line for thirteen years. From San Francisco to New York, his name was synonymous with the danger of the

He robbed twenty-nine stagecoach crews and never fired a shot! He didn't have to. His weapon was his reputation. Hs ammunition was intimidation. He was a hood who hid his face. No one ever saw him. The hooded bandit armed with fear was the famous Black Bart. It is strange that he who struck fear in so many was himself so fearful of horses that he rode a buggy to and from robberies - Charles E. Boles, a druggist from Decatur, Illinois.

"Fear" -- David was a man acquainted with situations that would strike fear in any person's heart. From this Psalm we learn...

I. The Fact of Fear - vv. 1-3, 12

Illustration: In 1933, the United States was in the terrifying clutches of economic depression. Franklin D. Roosevelt believed the greatest problem was not the absence of finances, but the presence of fear. In his inaugural address, a most memorable sentence was, "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."

In 1851, Henry David Thoreau wrote in his journal, "Nothing is so much to be feared as fear."

Transition Statement: Fear is a reality ... listen to the questions of David ...

Explanation: v. 1 - "whom shall I fear?" -- The Hebrew word for "fear" literally means "to fear." "Of whom shall I be afraid?" In Hebrew, this means "startled, to quake." This is intimidating fear!

Sought by foes -- v. 2 -- David knew Saul's armies hunted him like wild beasts hunting prey
Surrounded by enemies -- v. 3 -- the army was all around him.
Slandered by adversaries -- v. 12 -- David's person, protection, and public reputation were threatened.
This was a situation that would strike fear!

Application: We have all been there ... or may be we ar ...

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