Work as Worship (2 of 3) by J.D. Greear

This content is part of a series.

Work as Worship (2 of 3)
Series: God and the Rest of the Week
J.D. Greear
Genesis 2:15-17; Colossians 3:23-24


Introduction:
Big idea behind this series: Most Christians think of worship as something they do inside the church.
- And getting really committed to Jesus means getting busy at the church: volunteering at the church nursery, attending small group; going on a mission trip, serving at the soup kitchen...

- Three to thrive: too busy to sin. Our jobs (your jobs—secular jobs: Me, I’m a Professional Christian), this kind of thinking believes, are necessities that must be endured to put bread on the table. If God has any interest in our jobs, it’s just that we don’t cheat and tithe off of our salaries.

And when we think about people who try to bring God into the workplace, all kinds of disturbing images come to mind:
- Opening a coffee shop called "He Brews" or "holy grounds." Adam and Eve store.

- Defiantly saying "Merry Christmas" rather than "Happy Holidays" in the checkout line or sneaking a "Have a blessed day" into a ?salutation.

- Forcing awkward moments into sales calls:
- Now that I’ve sold you life insurance...how about insurance for life after death?

- I’ve got your name on our mailing list, but the more important question is, "Is your name in the Lamb’s Book of Life?

Giving away Jesus-themed gifts at Christmas like your pastor’s books...

That’s not me... Is that what it means serve God in your work?

Well, believe it or not, the Bible actually has a lot to say about our work... In fact, in Genesis 2, at the first mention of work in the Bible, the Hebrew word God uses for it is "abad," which shares the same root word as worship.1
- Adam worshipped God in the Garden not just by reading the Bible and praying and staying away from a few bad apples; he worshipped God by doing the work God put him in the garden to do, too.

- And I told you this last week: surely it cannot be coincidental that the majority of the p ...


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