Stand in the Gap (2 of 3) by J.D. Greear

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Stand in the Gap (2 of 3)
Series: All-In: 2014
J.D. Greear
2 Chronicles 28-31

Today we're going to see someone in a different period of Israel's history who actually did stand in the gap, and because of his faith and radical ''all-in'' obedience, his people, the southern kingdom of Israel, was preserved from destruction and experienced a great revival in his generation.

The man's name is Hezekiah; he lived 123 years before Ezekiel wrote these words (Ez. 22:30-31)-he held off Ezekiel's judgment for 123 years(!), and his story is found in 2 Chronicles 28.

Historian Thomas Carlyle famously said that the destinies of societies are shaped by great men and women who act boldly at key times. (Many historians criticize his theory, because multiple factors usually contribute to societal movements, but you can't overlook that there are ways that the courage and boldness of one person can change the course of an entire society.)

I want you, today, to see yourself as that one man, or one woman, standing in the gap for...your family; your group of friends; a college campus; us, as a church, standing in the gap for our city.

Being the faith instrument that connects his healing with their need.

- It's kind of like that scene in Back to the Future where the mad-scientist doctor goes up and joins the dangling pieces of the wire so that when lightning strikes at exactly 10:04 pm giving Michael J. Fox's DeLorean's flux capacitor going exactly 88 miles an hour it can have the energy it needs to get him back to the future.

Picture this.
- You are going to be that human bridge that connects the lightning of God's power and someone's flux capacitor...and the analogy starts to break down pretty dramatically at that point, but you get it.

Hezekiah was that man in the gap. We should be the people in the gap.

Let's start in 2 Chronicles 28...Hezekiah was born into the Southern kingdom of Israel at a time of great moral degradation. Ahaz, his father, had been ...

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