The Seeker's Chapter (4 of 4) by J.D. Greear

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The Seeker's Chapter (4 of 4)
Series: Upside-Down Christmas
J.D. Greear
Matthew 2:1-18

There are a lot of things we celebrate this time of year. Several major holidays. A friend of mine put together a list of holidays besides Christmas that we celebrate.1 These were on his list:

• December 5 is National Ninja Day. Some of you say, ''I didn't ?see that coming.'' That's because it's Ninja Day. If you saw it ?coming, it couldn't be Ninja Day.
• December 16 is officially Chocolate-Covered-Anything Day, ?which I think is awesome because chocolate covered anything is awesome-because you can always suck the chocolate off and ignore the rest.
• December 18 is National Wear a Plunger on your Head Day- Secret desire? This is the day you can do it and not feel weird. Tradition is to use a new plunger.
• And then, of course, for all you Seinfeld fans, December 23 is ''Festivus for the rest of us.'' (So I hope you have your pole and are ready for the airing of grievances.) ?

No disrespect to any of those, but I think there's something special about Christmas. Even beyond the traditions, and the family time, the gifts... there's something special about the story of the divine intersecting the human... even for people who are not Christians, I've found, there's a strange appeal to this. ?

I want us to spend a few minutes in a familiar Christmas story, the story of the wise men who came to find Jesus. ?

The story takes place in Matthew 2, which I would call ''the seeker's chapter'' in the Bible. It deals with how many people search for God and how they find him, why some seek stop short, and even deals with the biggest objection that seekers have with a loving God. ?

If you are unfamiliar with the story:

• A group of wise men from the East see a divinely appointed star in the heavens, figure out that it means something significant, and follow the star to Israel.
• When they get there they ask Herod, the current king of Israel, where the promised ki ...

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