Come Behold the Wondrous Mystery (1 of 2) by J.D. Greear

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Come Behold the Wondrous Mystery (1 of 2)
Series: God With Us
J.D. Greear
Colossians 1:15-20


Start a new mini-series leading up to DPAC (Epic). God With Us.

Here's why: For many years my relationship with God felt distant- cold, almost. I knew a lot of truths about God; and I was trying to do the things he commanded, but it always seemed to be from a distance. He seemed kind of like a busy teacher who had given an assignment and then stepped out of the room, leaving us students to get it done. I knew he was coming back, so I was busy with the assignment, but how do you love, and feel close, to someone like that?

• You see, the Great Commandment is that we love God with all our heart, soul and mind.

• That means he is first in our affections: that we crave and desire and feel connected to God more than anyone else...

• I wanted that warmth of emotion, but didn't know really how to develop it.

I want to show you in this series that you can't love God until he becomes personal to you; until you see that what he did in history for you, and that leads to a personal intimacy with Jesus.

J.C. Ryle: ''You'll never grow as a Christian until you develop a personal intimacy with the Lord Jesus; until you deal with him as you would a best friend-turn to him first in every need; consult him at every step; talk to him about all your difficulties; spread before him all your sorrows; allow him to share in all your joys; do all things as in his sight; to go through every day leaning on him.''1
• That's when doctrine becomes a dynamic relationship; when the verse becomes a voice.

Do you have that kind of intimacy with God? Do you relate to God as a man relates to a friend? For the next few weeks, that's what I want to press, because, at its very core, that is what Christmas is about.
• Chris Green: It's not about presents; it's about the presence.

To do this, we're going to look at two of the oldest Christmas carols ever written. Sad ...

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