Thirsty Water! (5 of 6) by Dennis Marquardt

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Thirsty Water! (5 of 6)
Series: 7 Last Sayings of Christ on the Cross
Dennis Marquardt
John 19:28-29; 4:4-42; Exodus 15:22-25

INTRO: Whenever we think of Christ we are confronted with a number of amazing paradoxes: He is the Lion and the Lamb - one an image of power, majesty, and might; the other a picture of innocence, weakness, and sacrifice. He is the King and the Servant in Isaiah; a contrast that the Jews found difficult to accept in one person. He is both man and God, but not 50/50, He is 100% man, 100% God.

Here on the cross we see another paradox with Christ, He who is "Living Water" cries out "I Thirst!" - how can this be?

This cry of Christ's from the cross demonstrated the humanity of Christ and also reflected the anguish of the soul as He bore the sins of many! Since this cry followed the cry of "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" it may reflect the inner anguish of thirst that goes beyond just the physical, it may also reflect the "thirst" of the soul for God's presence.

ILLUS: Christ did not come to do away with suffering; He did not come to explain it; He came to fill it with His presence. Paul Claudel -- James S. Hewett, Illustrations Unlimited (Wheaton: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc, 1988) p. 20.

Jesus by thirsting understood our humanity and our dryness of soul, He who conquered the grave now invites us to come and fill that thirst: "If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me and drink." (John 7:37) We need not "thirst" - for we can be filled!

PROP. SENT: The Scriptures teach us Jesus embraced our "thirst" so that He can satisfy it, He is the "living water" that alone can fill the thirst in our soul for God.

I. GREAT DRYNESS! Jn. 19:28-29; Ex. 15:22-25

A. Struggle! Jn. 19:28 Ex. 15:22-24
1. Christ's struggle was a bitter one - He who was "living water" was now experiencing "thirst" in a profound way!
a. Life sometimes brings times of dryness.
b. Traveling through the wilderness Israel found the ...

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