I'm Not Okay, You're Not Okay! (8 of 34) by Keith Krell

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I'm Not Okay, You're Not Okay! (8 of 34)
Series: Good News from God
Keith Krell
Romans 3:9-20

Many years ago, The London Times had a correspondent who ended many of his articles with the words, "What is wrong with the world today?" Finally, in response, G. K. Chesterton (1874-1936), the well-known Christian writer and apologist, wrote the following reply to the paper, "Dear Editor, What's wrong with the world? I am. Faithfully Yours, G. K. Chesterton." In those few words Chesterton beautifully summed up the Bible's teaching concerning the central problem of the world. It's people! More specifically, it's what lies within us-our inner being or person. As the great theologian Pogo said, "We have met the enemy and he is us."

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but I'm not okay and neither are you. In short, we're the problem in the world today. We're our own worst enemy. As sinful as Satan is, our sin problem is so severe and all-encompassing that we're in deep trouble all on our own. There's no need to claim, "The Devil made me do it!" We sin quite well without him or anyone else tempting us to sin (cf. Jas 1:14). We're disgustingly sinful in our own selves. In Romans 3:9-20, we're faced squarely with the reality of our sin against God and other people. This text is a fitting climax to the entire section (1:18-3:20) and functions like a great baseball relief pitcher. In the eight or ninth inning, "the closer" comes in to replace whoever is pitching and promptly attempts to "put the game away" for his team. Well, Paul closes his argument here with the same kind of determination and authority. This text is the clincher, the closer, in this section of Romans. This passage, like no other, will tell us the truth about humankind. The bottom line is: I'm not okay, you're not okay. Paul reveals three penetrating truths about humanity.

1. We are universally sinful (3:9). Paul begins with a formal legal charge: All are under sin. He writes, "What then? Are ...

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