The Freedom of Slavery (15 of 34) by Keith Krell

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The Freedom of Slavery (15 of 34)
Series: Good News from God
Keith Krell
Romans 6:15-23

One of the most famous chimpanzees of all time is one by the name of Washoe. Some soldiers picked up Washoe in West Africa. In 1966 she was adopted by two doctors who raised her almost like a child. In 1970, however, she was turned over to another pair of doctors and taken to the University of Oklahoma. Here she went through rigorous training to become the first non-human to learn American Sign Language. She learned over 140 signs! It was discovered, however, that she was just mimicking all that she had been taught. After several years the staff decided that she was able to try to conceptualize. "She is going to say what is on her heart!" the staff declared. In her safe and secure cage, well taken care of, Washoe said the first three words of her own initiative: "LET ME OUT!!!" She signed these words several times.

Even in animals, there is a desire for freedom. Given the chance most animals would leave safety for the chance for freedom. Humans long for freedom as well. We yearn to enjoy life, free from guilt and despair. We want to live significant lives. Moreover, God has created us for freedom-it is our intended destiny. Yet the great Christian paradox is that we are freed from the slavery of sin to become slaves to God. We could put it like this: True freedom is slavery to Christ. In Romans 6:15-23 Paul shares two critical facts about slavery.

1. Slavery is Inevitable (6:15-18). In the 1970s Bob Dylan sang a song entitled, "You Gotta' Serve Somebody!" Dylan took this song straight out of Scripture. The apostle Paul states that every person serves somebody or something. He writes, "What then? Shall we sin because we are not under law but under grace? May it never be!" (6:15) Paul returns to his original question in 6:1: Does grace encourage sin? Once again his response is, "May it never be!" or "What in the world are you thinking?!" (My translation) Perhap ...

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