Burden-Bearers by Johnny Hunt

Johnny Hunt
Galatians 6:2-6
June 26, 2011

INTRODUCTION: In 1 Corinthians 10:12-13, "Therefore let him who thinks he stands take heed lest he fall. No temptation has overtaken you except such as is common to man; but God is faithful, who will not allow you to be tempted beyond what you are able, but with the temptation will also make the way of escape, that you may be able to bear it."

This passage speaks of a particular need that occurs when 1 Cor. 10:12-13 is violated. The Lord "will not allow you to be tempted beyond what you are able." (He won't; but you will, or you did.)

Beginning with Gal. 6:2, Paul is referring to the sin of Gal. 6:1 and the great need for a "burden bearer."

The theme of Galatians is legalism. The legalist is not interested in bearing burdens. Instead, he adds to the burdens of others. The Jerusalem Council.

Acts 15:10, "Now therefore, why do you test God by putting a yoke on the neck of the disciples which neither our fathers nor we were able to bear?"

In Jesus' day He spoke of the Pharisees' sin. Matthew 23:4, "For they bind heavy burdens, hard to bear, and lay them on men's shoulders; but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers."

The legalist is always harder on other people than he is on himself, but the Spirit-led burden bearer demands more of himself than he does of others that he might be able to help others. By the way, nothing reveals the wickedness of legalism better than the way the legalist treats those who have sinned.

There is a difference in aim and attitude when you contrast the spiritual burden bearer with the legalist. The aim of the spiritual would be to restore in love, while the legalist would exploit the brother. The attitude of the spiritual is an approach in meekness and love, while the legalist has an attitude of pride and condemnation. Instead of trying to restore the erring brother, the legalist will condemn him and then use the brother ...

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