O Come, All Ye Faithful (2 of 3) by Roger Thomas

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O Come, All Ye Faithful (2 of 3)
Series: Songs of Christmas
Roger Thomas
Matthew 1:18-2:12
December 17, 2006

Introduction: Some people are serious about their Christmas shopping. Even a fire didn't deter holiday shoppers in a Dillard's in Mentor, Ohio. On December 7, a fire broke out in a high voltage electrical panel near the women's department. Firefighters had it out in less than ten minutes. However, by then, the fire damaged about $30,000 worth of merchandise. Insurance officials estimated smoke damage at another $100,000. The amazing part, according to the fire chief, was the customers' reaction. They wanted to stay and shop even after the smoke was making it hard to see. The firefighters even had to post guards at the door to keep shoppers from coming. The Dillards' manager said the store would reopen in a few days. He predicted a long line waiting to check on the "fire sale."

Wouldn't it be wonderful if we all took the Christmas message, not just Christmas shopping, just as seriously? That's the call of our next Christmas song. In our lead up to Christmas this year, I am examining three of my favorite Christmas carols. My prayer is that you will sing and hear these familiar songs a bit differently after we take a closer look at their words and the message they proclaim. I hope that every time you hear one of these songs on the radio or in a store while shopping, you will not just hear the same old holiday background music. You will think about the heart of Christmas.

Despite the fact that today's song is one of the most familiar Christmas hymns, a great deal of mystery surrounds its origins. Christians have sung O Come, All Ye Faithful, or Adeste Fidelis as it is known in Latin, for over two-hundred fifty years. The Latin name persists because that seems to have been the original language of the song. Adeste Fidelis are the first two words in Latin. They roughly translate as "be near, you faithful." The Latin origins expl ...


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