For I Am Sensitive To My Situation (2 of 8) by Wayne Hinson

This content is part of a series.

For I Am Sensitive To My Situation (2 of 8)
Series: Lord, I'm Coming Home
Wayne Hinson
Psalm 51:3-5

Outline:
I. True Repentance Involves An Acknowledgement Of Sin
A) Acknowledge The Reality Of Sin
B) Acknowledge The Responsibility Of Sin
C) Acknowledge The Realm Of Sin

II. True Repentance Indicates The Aim Of Sin
A) Sin Is Directed At God's Reputation
B) Sin Will Demand God's Rebuke
C) Sin Will Draw God's Rule

III. True Repentance Interprets The Acquiring Of Sin
A) Sin Had Attracted David's Beholding
B) Sin Was Apparent In David's Beginning

Intro: It becomes strikingly evident that David had a firm grip on exactly what the situation was, and exactly who was the blame for it. What a contrast we see in the attitude of repentance that now totally controls David, and the prevailing attitude of today. It appears that noone will accept responsibility for their own sins anymore. Such was not the casewith this man that we are reading the confession of. This is probably the most perfect picture of repentance that can be found anywhere in the Word of God. Not one time in this lengthy and heart wrenching confession, do we see David attempting to attribute the blame of his sin on another. No, Nathan had tagged him, and now David was accepting the consequences for his actions. In these days of situational ethics, relative sin, and absolutely no responsibility for one's own actions, may God help us to preach the true repentance found in Psalm 51. In David's admission and sensitivity to this terrible situation, we see that:


I. True Repentance Involves An Acknowledgement Of Sin (vs 3)

A) Acknowledge The Reality Of Sin ("for I acknowledge")
This special word "acknowledge", has many legal overtones and in some ways, resembles a courtroom scene. To "acknowledge" means "to be guilty, to realize the offense levied against one self". This definition strongly resembles the plea that would be rendered in a court room, when the judge rea ...


There are 11723 characters in the full content. This excerpt only shows a 2000 character sample of the full content.

Price:  $4.99 or 1 credit
Sign up for a Free Trial with SermonSearch.com and download this sermon free today!