Truth For The Middle-Class by Johnny Hunt

Truth For The Middle-Class
Johnny Hunt
James 2:5-9
Nov. 1, 2009

INTRODUCTION: In case James' hearers were not yet convinced, James now presents them with some formidable logic in the form of spiritual paradox. Remember, James is a moral theologian. For him, what we do says far more about the authenticity of our faith then what we say we believe. A heart that practices favoritism towards the privileged and ignores the poor is imperiled, to say the least.

James would quickly concern himself with this type question: "Does our theology (study of God) make a difference? Does the unified call of Scripture and the example of Christ not to show partiality have an effect on us?"

In this passage, James continues his argument by reminding his friends that they are showing special treatment to the very class of people who are abusing them. He will make this crystal clear by the questions he poses. James will share some solid biblical truth, but note, he does it by speaking "truth in love."

I. WHAT THE LORD WISHES THE WORLD TO SEE.
5

"Has God not chosen the poor of this world to be rich in faith..." ("those who are poor in the eyes of the world") - there are many poor who are spiritually poor, though there are rich who are spiritually rich.

AN OBSERVATION: The materially poor are so much more likely to truly realize their spiritual need. The poor, in general, are spiritually advantaged.

James drives home the poor rich/rich poor paradox. This reminds us that the ground is level around the cross. With this being true, it is absurd to be partial toward anyone.

"Listen, my beloved brethren" - a warm admonition aimed at the heart. James appeals to the wisdom of these saints and to their ability to reason.

A. HIS CHOOSING. 5a

"Has God not chosen the poor of this world"

1. His Initiative

1 Corinthians 1:26-29, "For you see your calling, brethren, that not many wise according to the flesh, not many mighty, not many nob ...


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