Don't Push the Snooze Button by J. Gerald Harris

Don't Push the Snooze Button
Dr. Gerald Harris
Matthew 26:36-46

A young paratrooper was learning to jump. He was given the following instructions: First, jump when you're told. Second, count ten and pull the ripcord. Third, in the very unlikely even that it doesn't open, pull the second chute open. And fourth, when you get down a truck will take you back to base.

The plane ascended to the proper height. The men started peeling out and jumped when told. He counted to ten and pulled the cord but the chute failed to open. He proceeded to the back up plan: he pulled the cord of the second chute. It too failed to open. As he went by one of his buddies he was heard to say, "And I'll bet you when we get down there the truck won't be there either."


In our text for this evening you can almost see the disappointment on the face of Jesus. You can almost hear the disappointment in the sound of his voice as he approaches the sleeping disciples in the garden of Gethsemane and says, "What, could ye not watch with me one hour?"

Think about it. The three men that Jesus took with him into the Garden of Gethsemane were three of his disciples. IN fact, these three men constituted the inner circle of disciples. These were the most intimate disciples that Jesus had. They alone were with him on the mount of transfiguration. They alone were with Him when He raised the daughter of Jairus from the dead. They had been subject to so much of the teaching of Jesus and had been privileged to share some of the intimate experiences of the Lord. And yet in this critical moment when Jesus said, "My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death," He discovered that He could not count on them. They were sleeping when they should have been watching. He was disappointed in their response to him in His hour of need. They should never have pushed the snooze button and gone back to sleep, but the did it three times.

Tonight we're going to be dealing with this matter of ...

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