Taking the First Step by Daniel Rodgers

Taking the First Step
Dan Rodgers
Matthew 14:22-36

INTRODUCTION: In this story, Jesus had just fed the multitudes. He took two fish and five loves of bread; the Bible says he fed 5,000 men, not to mention the women and children (Matthew 14:21).

Following the miracle of the loaves and the fishes, Jesus instructed His disciples to get into a boat, while He went up into a mountain to pray.

No sooner had the disciples begun their voyage on the sea, than a storm arose, causing them to fear for their lives. The Bible says it was the fourth watch, which would be the last watch before daylight, the darkest time of the night. The Lord was aware of their circumstances; the Bible says in vs. 25, "Jesus went unto them, walking on the sea."

When they saw Jesus, the disciples thought they were seeing a spirit; they cried out in fear. Jesus said unto them, "Be of good cheer; it is I; be not afraid" (vs. 27).

When Peter saw Jesus walking on the water, he asked the Lord to let him come to Him. Jesus said in vs. 29, "Come." And Peter stepped out of the boat into the water.

Now, I want us to hold that thought, as we consider the message, "Taking the First Step."

I. An Exercise of Faith
II. An Example to Others
III. An Evidence of Trust

I. AN EXERCISE OF FAITH
A. The First Step
1. The Bible says in vs. 29, "And when Peter was come down out of the ship, he walked on water to go to Jesus." Peter exercised a certain amount of faith when he put his foot into the water. This was his first step. Faith always begins with a first step:

a. There is the first step of salvation. In order to come to Jesus, one must make the first step toward Him. Jesus has already taken the first step toward us, the cross proves that. Can I ask you; have you taken that first step? Have you received Christ as your Savior? Jesus said in John 6:37, "All that the Father giveth me shall come to me; and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast ...


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