Lessons from Caller's Spring (14 of 17) by Ken Trivette

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Lessons from Caller's Spring (14 of 17)
Series: Samson: A Life of Strength & Weakness
Ken Trivette
Judges 15:18-20

Outline
1. A REMINDER OF SAMSON'S HUMANITY
a) Prevent Arrogance
b) Promote Dependence
2. A RESOURCE FOR SAMSON'S EXTREMITY
a) What He Acknowledged in Prayer
b) What He Asked in Prayer
3. A REASSURACE IN SAMON'S NECESSITY
a) A Remarkable Supply
b) A Reviving Supply

1. Most often, our blessings are followed by battles, the mountains are followed by valleys, our triumphs are followed by tests and our highs are followed by lows. In our last study we saw Samson at a high point in his life. Whereas, so much of his life, up to this point, had been a major disappointment, his attitudes and actions were commendable.

2. He reacted wisely when the men of Judah joined hands with the Philistines to capture him. Instead of retaliating, as he had on other occasions, he allowed himself to be taken by his own people that he could take actions against the Philistines, actions for which he had been called of God to take.

3. With the new jawbone of an ass he scored a great victory for both God and Judah by slaying a thousand of the enemy. He celebrated his victory by naming the place "Ramathlehi" (Judges 15:17) which means "Jawbone Hill." The name would always remind people of what had happened.

4. However, no sooner had he accomplished his great feat and he hit a low. Totally exhausted and dehydrated from the heat of the hot climate and the energy expended in the fight, "he was sore athirst" (15:18). In one moment he is mighty man defeating the enemy right and left, but the next moment he is a weakling totally at a point of despair.

5. I have found that God designs such contrasts in our life. He always allows a low when there has been a high, and as in everything He does, it is marked by a purpose. Let's look at the scene before us Judges 15:18-20 and glean three lessons that we often learn in the lows that follow our highs. First, think ...


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