Paul's Visit to Corinth (11 of 26) by Daniel Rodgers

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Paul's Visit to Corinth (11 of 26)
Series: The Acts of the Apostles
Volume II
Dan Rodgers

TEXT: Acts 18:1-11

INTRODUCTION: In last week's lesson, chapter seventeen, we talked about the superstitious Anthenians. When Paul arrived in Athens, the Bible says in (vs. 16), "...his spirit was stirred in him, when he saw the city wholly given to idolatry." They had even erected an altar with the inscription, "To the Unknown God." Paul said in (vs. 22), "Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious."

In our lesson tonight, Paul travels from Athens to the city of Corinth.

HISTORY: Corinth was the political and commercial center of Greece, surpassing Athens in importance. It had a reputation for great wickedness and immorality. A temple to Aphrodite—goddess of love and war—had been built on the large hill behind the city. Paul found Corinth both a challenge and a great ministry opportunity. Later, he would write letters to the Corinthians dealing in part with the problems of immorality.1

I have two points this evening:
I. Paul, the Tentmaker
II. Paul, the Troublemaker

I. PAUL, THE TENTMAKER (VV. 1-3)

A. Common Friends (vv. 1, 2)

1. Aquila was a Jew, who, along with his wife, Priscilla, had been driven from Rome by the Roman Emperor, Claudius. The Bible does not say, nor do we know at this point, whether or not Aquila and Priscilla were Christians. In all probability, they were; for Claudius drove out the Christians, along with the Jews. Some have supposed that Paul led them to Christ; we just do not know for certain.

a. In either case, the Lord brought these three
people together for a reason. There is something we can learn from this story; life happens on purpose, not by accident. When Aquila and Priscilla were being persecuted in Rome and being forced from their home, no doubt, they had many questions. When peculiar and difficult things happen to us, we, too, have questions. We sh ...


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