Out with Judas, in with Matthias (3 of 24) by Daniel Rodgers

This content is part of a series.

Out with Judas, in with Matthias (3 of 24)
Series: The Acts of the Apostles: A Verse-by-Verse Study
Dan Rodgers
Acts 1:12-26
August 22, 2007

INTRODUCTION: In our lesson last week, we looked at (vv. 9-11) and the ascension of Jesus. Let's read that passage once again.

Our lesson this evening shifts from the Mt. of Olives to the Upper Room, just a short distance away; the Bible says, "a sabbath day's journey" (vs. 12). That would be about a mile and a half.

Here, in an upper room, the disciples gathered together to prayerfully consider who would replace Judas as one of the Lord's 12 disciples (vs. 14). In (vs. 15), we are told that there were about 120 disciples present; remember, the word disciple simply means "one who follows another." These were all followers of Jesus.

I have two main points to our outlines this evening:

I. The Fall of Judas
II. The Rise of Matthias


Truly, the story of Judas is one of the most tragic stories in the entire Bible. Judas was one of the 12 disciples, a man who followed the Lord, sat and ate with Him, ministered on his behalf, and yet, a man who died and went to hell...

A. His Official Position

1. Judas was one of the 12 disciples. He had a high calling and held an honorable position; and yet, he was a man who never really knew the Lord--Jesus called him a "devil." This goes to show you that holding a position of leadership in the church does not necessarily mean a man is saved.

B. His False Profession

1. Judas professed faith in Christ; he led everyone to believe he was one of God's own. Some people ask; "Since Jesus is God and God knows everything, why did He pick Judas to be one of His 12 disciples? He knew he would betray Him, why was he chosen?" In John 6:64, Jesus said, "But there are some of you that believe not. For Jesus knew from the beginning who they were that believed not, and who should betray him."

a. Here's what we can say: God lov ...

There are 8482 characters in the full content. This excerpt only shows a 2000 character sample of the full content.

Price:  $4.99 or 1 credit
Sign up for a Free Trial with SermonSearch.com and download this sermon free today!