We Have Much to Remember (3 of 6) by Roger Thomas

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We Have Much to Remember (3 of 6)
Series: Season of the Family
Roger Thomas
John 15:13; Proverbs 10:7; Romans 5:7-9

Introduction: Memorial Day doesn't mean what it once did. For most, Memorial Day is just another Monday holiday. It marks the beginning of summer. It's the weekend of the Indy 500. School's out. The pools open. It provides the first real chance for picnics, BBQ's, and maybe an outing to the lake. It hasn't always been that way.

Memorial Day grew out of the human need to remember where we have been. Only then can we figure out where we are going. The cherished memories of a nation, a town, a church, or a family provide the values and dream that one generation passes on to the next. Forgetting means dropping the torch.

All of this was on the mind of President Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1863 as he made his way to the Pennsylvania battlefield. He feared that he might be the last president of the United States. The country teetered on the brink of self-destruction. The ceremony that afternoon would dedicate the site of the cemetery for the over forty thousand soldiers killed at Gettysburg in the three-day battle the previous July. Lincoln's remarks provided the seedbed for what would become Memorial Day.

''Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal,'' he began. Less than two minutes later, he concluded, ''The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here (referring to the sacrifice of the soldiers). It is for us the living rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us--that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion--that we here high ...

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