I Am the Door by Tony Nester

I Am the Door
Tony Nester
John 10:7-10
December 31, 2006

Pastor Tony R. Nester, Trinity United Methodist Church, Waverly, Iowa

(John 10:7-10) "So again Jesus said to them, "Very truly, I tell you, I am the door for the sheep. {8} All who came before me are thieves and bandits; but the sheep did not listen to them. {9} I am the door. Whoever enters by me will be saved, and will come in and go out and find pasture. {10} The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly."

"I am the door."

We're not as familiar with the image of Jesus as a door as we are with imaging him as the Good Shepherd, the Bread of Life, as Living Water, or as the Lamb of God.

I've never heard a praise song about Jesus being a door nor seen him portrayed as a door in a stained glass window. I've seen him standing and knocking at the door as is mentioned in Revelation 3:20. But that's not the same as being himself a door as we have in John 10:9.

And yet doors are of the utmost importance to us, just as Jesus knew they were. Doors can lock us out, or lock us in, or let us in to where we need to go.

One of Evelyn's frustrations in living with me is my habit of locking doors which has on several occasions left her locked out of our home.

I grew up in old house with lots of creaky and scary noises. My father was away most of the time to work or to drink. My mother sometimes left me alone to work outside the home. I was to lock the doors put myself to bed upstairs. It wasn't a pleasant experience. Under the covers I would anxiously wonder if I had in fact locked all the downstairs doors, including the door to the cellar. We had a coal cellar that you could sneak into by sliding away a lid over a chute on the back porch. I used it myself several times when I came home from school and found the house locked. If a burglar got in through the chute my only protection was to make sure that the ...

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