The Hope of the World by David Cawston

The Hope of the World
David Cawston

Abraham Lincoln was perhaps our greatest President. He was also a man who fought a lifelong battle with despair. He repeatedly fell victim to bouts of depression.

During one of those bouts, years before becoming President, he left his post at the Illinois State Legislature, and returned home to try to pick up his work as a lawyer. But he remained emaciated and could hardly speak above a whisper. He couldn't summarize the news. He couldn't attend to business. At that low point he wrote these words
in a diary: "I am now the most miserable man living. If what I feel were equally distributed to the whole human family, there would not be one cheerful face on earth. Whether I shall ever be better I cannot tell .. To remain as I am is impossible; I must die or be better."

Like Abraham Lincoln, many of us here this morning have had our bouts with depression. Lincoln was right. We cannot live in total despair. We either die or get better. Life without some degree of hope is no life at all.

How hopeful are you?

Many people are feeling hopeless and discouraged by the events that are transiping in our world today.

Y2K Concerns?
Terrorist Concerns?
Financial Problems?
Family Problems?

HOPELESSNESS: ARE YOU THERE RIGHT NOW IN YOUR LIFE?
1. A hopeless person feels the situation is hopeless.
2. A hopeless person feels there is nothing that can be done about it.
3. A hopeless person feels the situation is out of his control.

Hal Lindsay: "THE TERMINAL GENERATION"
"Man can live 40 days without food, about 3 days without water, about 8 minutes
without air . . . but only 1 second without hope."

The natural flights of the human mind are not from pleasure to pleasure but from hope to hope. --Samuel Johnson

What oxygen is to the lungs, such is hope to the human heart.

WEBSTER defines hopelessness as being destitute of hope; having no expectation
of good, despairing. It means to be de ...


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