Standing Together in Adversity (4 of 15) by Daniel Rodgers

This content is part of a series.

Standing Together in Adversity (4 of 15)
The Book of Philippians: A Verse by Verse Study
Dan Rodgers
Philippians 1:27-30
3/24/04


INTRODUCTION:

Last week we talked about Paul's desire to depart and be with Christ. He was torn between two decisions, whether or not to depart and be with Christ--which, in his words, was "far better," or to remain behind and minister to the saints. Of course, we now know he stayed behind (vs. 25).

In our lesson this evening, Paul addresses Christian suffering and adversity and the importance of solidarity and unity in the midst of it all. He also mentions the importance of our conduct--how we are to behave as those who belong to Christ.

Let me give you two points to our outline:

I. Standing Together In Christian Conduct
II. Standing Together In Christian Suffering


I. STANDING TOGETHER IN CHRISTIAN CONDUCT (VS. 27)

Please notice the word "conversation." This word in the Greek (politeuomai) means "conduct." Paul is talking about proper conduct: "Let your conduct be as it becometh the gospel."

Paul is saying, "As I hear of your affairs--whether in person, or whether absent from you, let me hear that your conduct is becoming of a Christian...that you are standing fast in one spirit, with one mind striving together for the faith of the gospel."

QUOTE: Someone once correctly stated, "A good example is the tallest kind of preaching." --Unknown

I would like to give you three things concerning our conduct:

A. Our obligation
We have an obligation to live like Christians--especially when it comes to adversity. People are watching us. They want to see how we suffer. Do we complain like they do, or do we turn to the Lord and lean on Him in our time of trial? The Philippians were suffering--they were being persecuted because of their stand for Christ and for the gospel's sake.

John 15:20, "Remember the word that I said unto you, The servant is not greater than his Lord. If they have persecuted ...


There are 11557 characters in the full content. This excerpt only shows a 2000 character sample of the full content.

Price:  $4.99 or 1 credit
Sign up for a Free Trial with SermonSearch.com and download this sermon free today!