Jacob: Have You Been to Bethel? (23 of 34) by Jerry Vines

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Jacob: Have You Been to Bethel? (23 of 34)
Jerry Vines
Genesis 27:1-28,22
8/03/03

Jacob and his family step to our Genesis stage. We are told in the Old Testament that God was the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Jacob has not had a personal experience with God and theses verses of Scripture will prepare us for Jacob coming to know the Lord in a personal kind of way.
Jacob is one of those characters in the Bible we find very easy to identify with. Jacob is so human. Jacob is so easy to understand. You know, of course, that his name means schemer and a schemer indeed he is. As we look at him we will see that even though the Lord saves him, his basic personality is there.
When the Lord saves you, your basic personality is still there. The Lord has to begin to work on us and develop us and help us to change in order to be the person God has saved us to be.
We are going to look this evening at how God saves Jacob and how God begins to change his life.
I want to call your attention first of all to,
I. Jacob's Difficulty.
Jacob's difficulty began far before these verses in our Scripture. I would remind you of the fact that we have studied previously about Jacob's home life and the difficulties and the conflicts which came into his home life. Actually it begins back in chapter 27, verse 41. Jacob has deceived his old father, Isaac. He has also stolen the blessing of his brother, Esau. So back in chapter 27, verse 41 it says this. "And Esau hated Jacob because of the blessing wherewith his father blessed him and Esau said in his heart, the days of mourning for my father are at hand, then will I slay my brother Jacob."
Esau, his brother said, "My dad is getting ready to die and just as soon as dad is dead, I'm going to kill this schemer, this deceiver brother of mine, Jacob."
Rebekah, his mother, understands that there is now danger in the home. She gathers her son to herself and says to him in verse 43, "My son, obey my voice, arise, flee thou to Leban my ...


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