Midnights...to Be Remembered by Ivor Powell

Midnights...to Be Remembered
Ivor Powell
Exodus 12:29; Acts 16:25; Matthew 25:6; Matthew 26:16

It was a night to be remembered! Pharaoh was mad; his people were sad; the outlook was bad, but the Hebrew captives were glad. Moses had challenged the Egyptian ruler. The nation was on the verge of rebellion, and everybody was scared of the fearless stranger who once had been a prince in the royal household. Rumors suggested the leader of the slaves was planning another plague, but something strange was taking place. Lambs were almost unobtainable; sheep farmers were making their fortune. The captives never had much money, but those who had saved a little were buying young sheep. All the purchasers seemed anxious, and those without money were trading keepsakes, clothing, anything, in a desperate attempt to obtain a lamb. The Egyptians were amazed, for although the Hebrews had been shepherds, this ardent attempt to purchase animals had never been witnessed within the nation. People in the streets were seeking reasons for the sudden surge in business.

A Night of Redemption . . . Salvation

At midnight the Lord smote all the firstborn of the land of Egypt. (Exod. 12:29)

All through the land the slaves were whispering, and messengers were hurrying from house to house saying, "This is the night. Be sure to do as Moses commanded." The night wore on. It was a few minutes before midnight, an uneasy calm had settled upon Egypt. The Israelites were within their homes, but none were sleeping. Strange marks were upon the lintel and doorways of their hovels. When the silence of the night was shattered, the people gravely smiled; the expected had happened. Moses was correct when he said, "For the Lord will pass through to smite the Egyptians; and when he seeth the blood upon the lintel, and on the two side posts, the Lord will pass over the door, and will not suffer the destroyer to come in unto your houses to smite you" (Exod. 12:23).

Did any of the Hebrews have Egypt ...


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