Trivial Pursuit by James Merritt

"Trivial Pursuit"
James Merritt
Luke 12:13-21


INTRODUCTION


1. I want to ask you some questions. See if you know the answer to them. "Who died with more than 1,000 patents to his name?" How about this one: "How many tentacles does a squid have?" Here is another one: "What was the name of Sir Isaac Newton's dog?" Now most of you are probably thinking to yourself "I don't know, and I don't care."


2. Well those questions come from a game called "Trivial Pursuit." It is a game that is designed to test your knowledge about things that don't matter one bit.


3. Jesus told a story about a man whose entire life was involved in playing the game of "trivial pursuit." This was a man who spent his entire life pursuing the trivial and the temporal, and he missed out on the essential and the eternal.


4. You have heard the saying "that a fool and his money soon part." Well this is a story about a man who was a fool, not because he would part with his money, but because he would not part with his money. This man was a fool, not because he had money, but because money had him. This man eventually died from the cancer of covetousness. In this age of "yuppiedom," gold watches, tailor-made suits, expensive jewelry, and luxurious cars, there is much that we can learn from the life of this man that God himself called a fool.


I. The Principle Jesus Taught


1. "And He said to them, 'Take heed and beware of covetousness.'" (v.15a) Now literally translated Jesus used two words: one meaning "watch out," and the other one meaning "be on guard." In other words Jesus was saying put your heart on maximum alert, because the snake of covetousness can slither behind you and bite you before you even know it.


2. Now the Greeks had a curious word for covetousness. The word they used literally means "a thirst for having more." Think about a man who is thirsty taking a drink of salt water. You know what salt water does, it on ...


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