So That's Where Bread Comes From by James Merritt

"So That's Where Bread Comes From"
By James Merritt
Matthew 6:11


INTRODUCTION


1. With the first two words of Matthew 6:11 - "Give us" - there is a shift in emphasis in this prayer. The first part of this prayer focuses on God and his nature. The primary focus of all prayer ought to be on God. But now it shifts to man and his needs.


2. In the last half of this prayer, the Lord Jesus shows us how to pray for all of our needs. Man is a creature that is limited by space and time. In space, he is a tripartite being--body, soul, and spirit. In time, he has a past, a present, and a future. The last part of this prayer deals with every need that man has, both in space and in time.


3. The first petition, "give us our daily bread," deals with our physical need. The second petition, "forgive us our debts," deals with our emotional needs. The last petition, "lead us not into temptation," deals with our spiritual need. One deals with the needs of the body; the second deals with the needs of the soul; the last deals with the needs of the spirit.


4. Beyond that, the first petition deals with our present. The second petition deals with our past. The third petition deals with our future.


5. But the focus here is on bread. Jesus specifically said we should pray for "bread." Now bread was used for a specific reason. Contrary to what you might think, bread here is almost an indispensable word.


6. There is a cute story about Colonel Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, who supposedly arranged a meeting with His Holiness, the Pope. He informed the Pope that he was willing to leave his entire estate of $1 billion to the Catholic church. But he said he had one favor to ask. He said, "You know that part of The Lord's Prayer, 'Give us this day our daily bread'? I wonder if you would mind changing it to 'Give us this day our daily chicken.' "


7. Well, the Pope said, "You don't know what you are asking. I can ...


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