All's Well That Ends Well (3 of 6) by Daniel Rodgers

This content is part of a series.

All's Well That Ends Well (3 of 6)
A CHARACTER STUDY ON DISCOURAGEMENT
Dan Rodgers
Job 6:1-3
January 15, 2003

INTRODUCTION:

1. In the three verses I just read, we find a man
just about as discouraged as someone can possibly be.
When we think about Job we automatically think of
suffering:

a. The Christian and the non-Christian alike, have for
centuries, drawn on the experiences, heartaches and
disappointments of Job.

1) More than any other thought, Job has been
remembered for patience, "the patience of Job." But,
was Job really a patient man?"

2. The answer to that question is, "yes," probably
more than most: Job 13:15, "Though he slay me, yet
will I trust in him: but I will maintain mine own ways
before him."

a. We are well aware that though Job never accused
God, and though he never sinned throughout his time of
grief, he certainly did have his times of impatience:

1) Job 23:1-4, "Then Job answered and said, 'Even to
day is my complaint bitter: my stroke is heavier than
my groaning. Oh that I knew where I might find him!
that I might come even to his seat! I would order my
cause before him, and fill my mouth with arguments.'"

3. This evening I want us to consider three things
about Job:

I. JOB'S DISCOURAGEMENT
II. JOB'S DESPUTATION
III. JOB'S DELIVERENCE


I. JOB'S DISCOURAGMENT

A. He was affected personally

1. Without going into all the details, we are reminded
of Job's tremendous personal loss: his servants, his
sheep and camels, and worst of all, Job lost his
children - all in a brief moment of time:

a. Job 1:18-19, "While he was yet speaking, there came
also another, and said, Thy sons and thy daughters
were eating and drinking wine in their eldest
brother's house: And, behold, there came a great wind
from the wilderness, and smote the four corners of the
house, and it fell upon the young men, and they are
dead; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee."
...


There are 10178 characters in the full content. This excerpt only shows a 2000 character sample of the full content.

Price:  $4.99 or 1 credit
Sign up for a Free Trial with SermonSearch.com and download this sermon free today!