What Does the Bible Mean, 'YOU Are Gods'? by Eddie Snipes

What does the Bible mean, 'You are gods'?
Eddie Snipes
Exodus 7:1; Psalm 82:1-7; Isaiah 41:20-24; Romans

One of the pet phrases in scripture that world
religions use to support their doctrine is 'you are
gods'. This is found several places in scripture and
in context the intent is clear. However, this can and
often is twisted into unbiblical meanings and used to
confuse those who value the Bible as authoritative.
This is used to persuade people that the Bible
supports their 'you are god' theory. The first passage
we will examine is Exodus 7:

1 So the LORD said to Moses: "See, I have made you as
God to Pharaoh, and Aaron your brother shall be your

I won't spend much time on this passage because the
intent is quite obvious. The KJV words it, "I have
made thee a god to Pharaoh". Pharaoh was the highest
god in ancient Egypt's pagan religious world. They had
gods for everything. Some gods had higher powers than
others. The Egyptians believed that it was necessary
to appease all the gods so that their wives could be
fertile, their crops would yield harvest, the rains
would come in season, and so on. Many of the plagues
God sent were specifically targeted against the gods
of Egypt. Pharaoh went down to greet the Nile floods
each year and honor this god. God sent Moses to meet
him and to turn the water to blood. This was a direct
assault against this false god. One of their gods was
a frog, so God sent a plague of millions of frogs.
Because Pharaoh thought he was a god, Moses was like a
rivaling god against Pharaoh. To yield to Moses was to
admit before his people that Pharaoh wasn't the
strongest god. God said in Exodus 9:14 that the
plagues against Pharaoh's gods were meant to show that
there was none like God. It was not to show that Moses
was a god. Moses was not a god. However, to the pagan
worshipping Pharaoh he was a god. It was only in
Pharaoh's eyes that Moses was cons ...

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