Sob Of A Lost Soul by Jesse Hendley

Sob of a Lost Soul
by Reverend Jesse M. Hendley
Psalm 16:10, 22:1

Turn with me to Psalm 16:10 and 22:1, and tonight I
want to speak to you on the "Sob of a Lost Soul." In
Psalm 16:10, the psalmist says he is a dying man and
recognizes he is a dying man and he has the confidence
that when he dies, God will not abandon him. So he
says in verse 8, "I have set the Lord always before
me; because he is at my right hand, I shall not be
moved. Therefore my heart is glad, and my glory
rejoiceth: my flesh also shall rest in hope. For thou
wilt not leave my soul in hell." Let's change the
translation and this is absolutely accurate to "thou
wilt not abandon my soul to hell." "Thou wilt not
abandon my soul to hell, neither will thou suffer
thine Holy One to see corruption. Thou wilt show me
the path of life: in thy presence is fullness of joy;
at thy right hand there are pleasures for evermore."

Here is a dying man, and anyone here in this room can
say this, anybody on the earth, any dying sinner that
can say this should be the happiest person in the
wide, wide world, and have the confidence that when I
die God will not abandon my soul and let it go to
hell. That is the greatest thing that a human being
can say. The word for leave here is in Hebrew and it
means to abandon, to give up, to let go, to absolutely
give up; and here is a man who has confidence as he
faces eternity that instead of God abandoning him, he
will see His face and in his presence enjoy the
fullness of joy for evermore. I said that anybody can
say, God when I come to die, you will not give me up.
You are going to take care of me; you ought to be the
happiest soul in this wide, wide world. That is what
it really means to be saved.

Now contrary to that in Psalm 22:1, the same Hebrew
word is used in these words, "My God, my God, why hast
thou forsaken me?" " Why have you given me up?" "Why
have you abandoned me?" "Why have ...

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