The Episle Of Paul To The Galatians Chapter 4:12-31 (10 of 15) by Harley Howard

This content is part of a series.

The Epistle of Paul To The Galatians Chapter 4:12-31
(10 of 15)
Harley Howard

12 Brethren, I beseech you, be as I [am]; for I [am]
as ye [are]: ye have not injured me at all.

Brother, become as I am, free in Christ, because I
also became as you were. Paul urges these Galatians to
free themselves from bondage to law as he had done. He
appeals to them to do this because he who had
possessed the advantages of the law, had foregone them
and had placed himself on the same level in relation
to the law as the Gentiles. He tells them that he gave
up all those time-honored Jewish customs and the
associations of his racial heritage to become like
them. He pleads with them not to abandon him when he
has abandoned all for them.

When The Thrill is Gone!

Paul urges these Galatians to free themselves from
bondage to law as he had done. He appeals to them to
do this because he who had possessed the advantages of
the law, had abandoned them all for grace. He tells
the Galatians that he gave up all those time-honored
Jewish customs and the associations of his racial
heritage to become like them. He pleads with them not
to abandon him when he has abandoned all for them.

13 Ye know how through infirmity of the flesh I
preached the gospel unto you at the first.

In verse 12, Paul appeals to this church which he
labored so much of his energies, to remain in the
freedoms that they began in Christ Jesus. It seems
that as we continue in this study that we see that the
love in which they demonstrated with Paul, turned to
hostility and contempt towards the man who brought
them the message of freedom. As I have said in this
study on a number of occasions, the intent of the Jews
was to discredit Paul as well as the message he
preached, and evidently they were very successful at
it. Their defection from Christ also meant a defection
from Paul. They no longer regarded him with the same
esteem that they once did. ...


There are 18168 characters in the full content. This excerpt only shows a 2000 character sample of the full content.

Price:  $4.99 or 1 credit
Sign up for a Free Trial with SermonSearch.com and download this sermon free today!