The Epistle To The Romans Chapter 15:1-22 (23 of 25) by Harley Howard

This content is part of a series.

The Epistle To The Romans Chapter 15:1-22 (23 of 25)
Harley Howard

As we have seen in some detail the activities of the
weaker brother, we now look at some direct
instructions to the stronger brother and of their
treatment to the weaker brother. Again, the weaker
brother is one who may be a new convert, or someone
who has not exercised his freedoms or liberties in
Christ because of conscience towards God. Those who
were exercising their liberties before God, were not
allowed by their liberties to cause the weaker brother
to stumble, nor was the weaker brother allowed to
judge the one who was exercising his liberties before
God. And one important note here. The liberties
expressed are those that are not in violation of the
scriptures, but of personal convictions or liberties
taken before God.

1 We then that are strong ought to bear the
infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.

The words strong and weak are exact opposites in the
Greek language. The word strong means "powerful,"
more than likely speaking of one's walk in the Lord,
whereas the word weak means "impotent, powerless," and
again probably refers to a new convert as far as
growth in Christ is concerned. Paul declares that
those who are strong in their walk in Christ should be
able to bear up under the weakness of those who are
weak and not to do anything simply as a means of
pleasing oneself. We must do things that would cause
harmony and not to exercise our liberties and freedoms
as a opportunity to serve the flesh, but by love serve
one another (Galatians 5:13).

2 Let every one of us please his neighbour for his
good to edification.

Instead of doing that which is agreeable to ourselves,
the stronger, mature believer does those things that
will please his neighbor (fellow) for his edification
(building up in the faith). This is to be done by
everyone who is mature towards those who are not.

3 For eve ...

There are 13444 characters in the full content. This excerpt only shows a 2000 character sample of the full content.

Price:  $4.99 or 1 credit
Sign up for a Free Trial with and download this sermon free today!