The Epistle To The Romans Chapter 4 (6 of 25) by Harley Howard

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The Epistle To The Romans Chapter 4 (6 of 25)
Harley Howard

Blessed Is The Forgiven Man! - Romans 4:1-8, Psalm

1 <> Blessed is he whose
transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered.
2 Blessed is the man unto whom the LORD imputeth not
iniquity, and in whose spirit there is no guile.

Paul has established clearly in the first and the
second chapter of the letter to the Romans, the lost
condition of the non religious and the religious man
who are both without saving grace which only comes
through faith in Christ Jesus. In part of the second
and third chapter, he presents the case for the lost
condition of the Jew without Christ. The Jew, with
all of the inherent privilege, is still lost because
the nation as a whole demonstrated the inability to
keep God's righteousness contained in the law. Paul
then concluded by saying that all men are under the
dominion of sin, none were righteous, all are vile in
speech, violent, destructive, not a single man knows
peace, and worst than all that, there is no fear of
God. The law therefore, being God's standard,
declared the entire world guilty before God. This
meant, and still means, that sin is the weight that a
man or woman carries in their life and because of
that, they are under the heavy hand of God for sure

The good news is that salvation, or justification,
which is a right standing before God, is given to any
individual by saving faith in Jesus Christ, and it is
a standing without any works, whether the works of the
law or any other work, because salvation is not by
works, but by faith. Both Jew and Gentile are saved
on the basis of faith, and not of works or merit.

In this 4th chapter of Romans, Paul proves that
justification (right standing before God) is clearly
illustrated in the lives of 2 of the most revered
patriarchs of the OT—Abraham and David. Now this is
important as it relates ...

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