The Witness-stand by T. De Witt Talmage

THE WITNESS-STAND
T. DeWitt Talmage
Acts 3:15

In the days of George Stephenson, the perfector of the
locomotive engine, the scientists proved conclusively
that a railway train could never be driven by
steam-power successfully without peril; but the
rushing express trains from Liverpool to Edinburgh,
and from Edinburgh to London, have made all the
nations witnesses of the splendid achievement.
Machinists and navigators proved conclusively that a
steamer could never cross the Atlantic Ocean; but no
sooner had they successfully proved the impossibility
of such an undertaking than the work was done, and the
passengers on the Cunard and the Inman and the
National and the White Star lines are witnesses. There
went up a guffaw of wise laughter at Professor Morse's
proposition to make the lightning of heaven his
errand-boy, and it was proved conclusively that the
thing could never be done; but now all the news of the
wide world, by Associated Press, put in your hands
every morning and night, has made all nations
witnesses.

So in the time of Christ it was proved conclusively
that it was impossible for him to rise from the dead.
It was shown logically that when a man was dead, he
was dead; and the heart and the liver and the lungs
having ceased to perform their offices, the limbs
would be rigid beyond all power of friction to arouse.
They showed it to be an absolute absurdity that the
dead Christ should ever get up alive; but no sooner
had they proved this than the dead Christ arose, and
the disciples beheld him, heard his voice, and talked
with him, and they took the witness-stand to prove
that to be true which the wiseacres of the day had
proved to be impossible; the record of the experiment
and of the testimony is in the text: "Him hath God
raised from the dead, whereof we are witnesses."

Now, let me play the skeptic for a moment. "There is
no God," says the skeptic, "for I have never seen him ...


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