Lord, Teach Us To Pray (4 of 6) by Ernest Easley

This content is part of a series.

Lord, Teach Us to Pray (4 of 6)
Dr. Ernest L. Easley
Matthew 6.9-15
June 1, 2003

Now as you are turning to Matthew 6... let me ask
you a question: If you wanted to learn how to excel at
golf... who would you want to teach you? Tiger Wood.
And why? Because Tiger knows golf.
What about playing basketball? If you wanted to
learn how to excel at basketball... who would you want
to teach you? Michael Jordan. And why? Because
Michael knows basketball.
And what about prayer? If you wanted to learn
how to excel at praying... who would you want teaching
you? Jesus! And why? Because Jesus knows prayer.
You see... Jesus was a man of prayer.
Mark 1.35, "Now in the morning, having risen a long
while before daylight, He went out and departed to a
solitary place; and there He prayed."
Do you know what that tells me? That tells me
that I will never become a man of God until I become a
man of prayer. And that goes for you too. If you
want to become a man of God... if you want to become a
woman of God... if you want God's best: then decide to
become a person of prayer.
You ought to pray because Jesus prayed. Prayer
is His priority. Prayer was His practice. For the
"Son can do nothing of Himself" (John 5.19).
Now before we look at Matthew 6... would you turn
to Luke 18. Here in Luke 18... Jesus is speaking in
parables. And in Luke 18.1 we read, "Then He spoke a
parable to them, that men ought always to pray and not
lose heart."
Do you know what it means to "lose heart?" It
means to grow weary. Do you ever grow weary? Do you
grow weary in raising those children? What about in
walking with God and staying pure? Do you ever grow
weary in your spiritual life?
Do you know why? Because sometime back there...
you stopped praying! Jesus said, "...that men always
ought to pray and not lose heart."
There is a link between prayer and strength...
prayer and hope. And the way to avoid ...


There are 9906 characters in the full content. This excerpt only shows a 2000 character sample of the full content.

Price:  $4.99 or 1 credit
Sign up for a Free Trial with SermonSearch.com and download this sermon free today!