The Good News (2 of 47) by Chris Walls

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The Good News (2 of 47)
Chris Walls
Romans 1:16-17

Introduction

I. Is to be Proclaimed

The Good news is to be proclaimed and not simply proclaimed, but it is to be proclaimed without shame. Paul, comes out in boldness here, and why shouldn't he? Paul had imprisoned in Philippi, chased out of Thessalonica, smuggled out of Berea, laughed at in Athens, regarded as a fool in Corinth, and stoned in Galatia.

Paul is now proclaiming the good news to Rome, the seat of political power and pagan religion. Nothing could change Paul's mind about proclaiming the gospel. He had not backed down before, why would he now.

It would have been easy for Paul to down play the gospel in Rome, because of the presence the city presented in the world at the time. Rome was the major city of the time and many people were scared of the power that it posed. It would be like looking down the eyes of the devil himself in many ways. Paul was proclaiming without shame the gospel to people that lived in a city that later would kill Christians for fun. It was the seed of pagan religion and philosophical thought.

II. Is a powerful Message

The word for power here is the word that we get the English word, "dynamite" from. The reason that Paul is not ashamed and is willing to proclaim the gospel is because it is the power of God to salvation. Paul understands that it is not anything that he does that cause salvation, but that he allows God's power move through him to bring people to salvation.

Now before you go away with the idea that this means that the gospel is dynamite, and can blow other religions out of the water or blow sinners out of the water hold on. It is powerful, but only because God gives it power. Man is used as God's agent of proclaiming the gospel, but man has no power in it. God is the one that gives the gospel its power to save people from their sin.

First to the Jew and then to the Greek, is not a presentation of a pecking order, bu ...


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