Have A Happy New You by Steve Wagers

Have a Happy New You
Steve Wagers
Philippians 3:12-14

An Indian, who was very unhappy, and disgruntled with himself, began to explain to his friend the inward battle, and struggle that he faced everyday. He said, "It seems as if two dogs are fighting within me: one is a black dog, he is savage and very bad, the other is a white dog, and he is gentle and very good, but the black fights with him all the time!" His friend curiously asked him, "Which dog wins?" The old Indian replied, "Which ever one I say 'sic him' to!"

No doubt many, if not all of us, can relate to the inner struggle that this man fought. As we come upon the dawn of another year, no doubt there are new goals, dreams, and ambitions that we will seek to pursue. There are also unpleasant things of the past year, that we would just as soon forget. Now, lest you misunderstand me, there's nothing wrong with setting goals, and dreams for the next year. However, most of the time, while we set out to make New Years' resolutions, we usually don't reach them because we've not made the essential New You solution. Simply put, we cannot enjoy a Happy New Year, until we become a Happy New You!

It is doubtful that Paul had in mind the New Year when he penned this section of this letter to Phillippi. As a matter of fact, we know that he penned it while serving time in a Roman prison cell. However, I believe that in these three verses, we can glean some thing about Paul's new goals, that will not only help us to have a Happy New Year, but, also, to "Have a Happy New You!"

In this verse, Paul evaluates his own life. He has come to the place where he is taking a personal inventory, and evaluation of his life. In this evaluation we see:
1. First, we see, as he's taking inventory and evaluating his life, a very honest admittance of some things.
2. He's being honest with himself, and with God. He admits that he's no ...

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