The Samaritan Woman (1 of 6) by Tony Nester

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The Samaritan Woman (1 of 6)
Touched by Jesus
Tony R. Nester
John 4:1-42

Today we begin a series of messages about people who
were touched by Jesus. We begin today with a story
from John, Chapter 4. It is the story of Jesus
meeting and ministering to a woman he encounters at a
well in Samaria.

I'm reading a shortened version of the story in the
interest of saving us some time. I encourage you to
read the entire Scripture as you have opportunity to
do so.

Listen for the Word of God.

(Read John 4:1-42 NRSV)

Jesus caught the Samaritan woman by surprise.

She had come to Jacob's well at Noon. It was a time
of day when she could expect to avoid people - the
usual time for drawing water was early morning or
evening. We know from what happens later in the story
that she may well have wanted to avoid people since
she didn't have a very good reputation. She was a
woman who had had five husbands and was now living
with a man to whom she was not married. I doubt that
she had a very high estimation of men.

When she saw Jesus sitting on the well she probably
viewed him with careful scrutiny, and hoped to draw
her water and leave in silence. Men couldn't be
trusted.

She notices (we're not told how) that Jesus is a Jew.
What's a Jew doing in Samaria? Most Jews avoided
Samaria at all costs.

The Samaritan woman is surprised to hear Jesus
speaking to her. He is asking her for a drink from
her water jar. She knows that Jews will not touch any
utensil used by a Samaritan, especially a woman.
Jesus is blatantly exposing himself to what Jews would
regard as one of the worst forms of spiritual
contamination:

- Talking to a woman in a private encounter
- Associating with a Samaritan
- Sharing her drinking cup.

What's going on? Who is this?

Jesus had made her curious.

(John 4:9 NRSV) "How is it that you, a Jew, ask a
drink of me, a woman of Samaria?"

Jesus tells her that ...


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