Struggle And Victory by T. De Witt Talmage

STRUGGLE AND VICTORY
(Preached after a domestic bereavement)
T. DeWitt Talmage
Genesis 32:26

The dust is rising from a traveling herd of cattle and
sheep and goats and camels. They are the present which
Jacob is sending to appease the anger of his offended
brother. That night Jacob halts by the brook Jabbok,
No rest for the weary man, no shining ladder to let
the angels down into his dream; but a fierce combat
until the morning with an unknown contestant. The two-
-Jacob and the stranger seize each other, each trying
to throw to the ground the other. The stranger, to
show his superior power touches Jacob, and the thigh-
bone springs from the socket, and Jacob goes limping
and a cripple all his days. As on the morning sky the
clusters of purple cloud begin to ripen, Jacob finds
out it is an angel with whom he has been wrestling,
and not one of his brother's coadjutors. As the angel
stretches himself up into the rising morn, he cries
out, "Let me go, the day breaketh!"

First of all, I learn from my subject that God lets
His children go into terrific struggle. Jacob loved
God; God loved him; but there Jacob is left alone in
the midnight by the brook Jabbok to struggle with this
mighty influence. So all the way down through the
ages. For Joseph, a pit; for Daniel, a wild beast's
den; for David, dethronement and exile; for Peter, a
prison; for Paul, a shipwreck; for John, desolate
Patmos; for Vashti, insulting cruelty; for Josephine,
banishment; for Mr. Burns, the outrage of the Montreal
populace; for Catherine, the Scotch martyr, the
drowning surges of the sea; for John Brown, of
Edinburgh, the pistolshot of Lord Claverhouse; for
McKail, a scaffold; for Hugh Latimer, a stake; for
Christ, a cross.

Some one said to a Christian reformer, "The world is
against you," and the Christian reformer replied,
"Then I am against the world." So it has been a
struggle all the way through the ages. But why nee ...


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