Aromatics For Easter by T. De Witt Talmage

T. DeWitt Talmage
Luke 24:1

Enchanting work have I before me this Easter morning,
for, imitating these women of the text, who brought
aromatics to the mausoleum of Christ, I am going to
unroll frankincense and balm and attar or roses and
cardamom from the East Indies, and odors from Arabia,
and, when we can inhale no more of the perfume, then
we will talk of sweet sounds and hear from the music
that shall wake the dead. In that first Easter scene,
Christ was lying flat on his back, lifeless, amidst
sculptured rocks - rocks over him, rocks under him,
and a door of rocks all bounded by the flowers and
fountains of Joseph's country-seat. Then a bright
immortal, having descended from heaven, quick and
flashing as a falling meteor, picks up the door of
rock and puts it aside as though it were a chair and
sits on it. Then Christ unwraps Himself of his
mortuary apparel, and takes the turban from His head
and folds it up deliberately and lays it down in one
place, and then puts the shroud in another place, and
comes out and finds that the soldiers who had been on
guard are lying around, pallid and in a dead swoon,
their swords bent and twisted. The illustrious
Prisoner of the tomb is discharged, and five hundred
people see Him at once. An especial congress of
ecclesiastics called, pay a bribe to the resuscitated
soldiers to say that there was no resurrection, but
that while they were overcome of slumber the
Christians had played resurrectionists and stolen the

The Marys are at the tomb with aromatics. Why did not
those women of the text bring thorns and nettles? for
these would more thoroughly have expressed the
piercing sorrows of themselves and their Lord. Why did
they not bring some national ensign, such as that of
the Roman eagle, typical of conquest? No; they brought
aromatics, suggestive to me of the fact that the
Gospel is to sweeten and deodorize the world. Th ...

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