Jonah, the Prophet with an Attitude (2 of 3) by David Cawston

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Jonah, the Prophet with an Attitude (2 of 3)
David Cawston

The story of the Book of Jonah opens back in the days of Jeroboam, the king Israel from 790 to 750 B.C. From the days of his grandfather Jehu, Israel had been repeatedly plundered by the warring of Syrians with their capital, Nineveh. But Jeroboam was credited with re-establishing the boundaries of Israel from the Haymath to the Dead Sea.

Here in the midst of Jeroboam, II's reign, God selects a man from southern Galilee by the name of Jonah to take a special message of repentance to the enemies of Israel, the Assyrians living in the great metropolis area of Nineveh. Nineveh is one of the most ancient large cities having been established by the great warrior Nimrod, back in the days of the patriarchs. It is located East of the Tigress River and it was the royal residence of the Assyrian kings.

So Jonah becomes the prophet to a heathen nation, to the enemies of Israel, to the city of Nineveh, the heart of Assyria, to declare to them the judgment of God.

The overall lesson of the Book of Jonah, is that God cares about the heathen. He reaches to them and desires for their salvation. His judgment is not desired to be upon them. He had no obligation to send a prophet to Nineveh. But He chose to do so. It comes back to the scripture that is written by the Apostle Peter who says, ''He is not willing that any should perish.'' Let's look into the lessons of Jonah.

God doesn't make you go against your will, but He knows how to make you willing to go. (Chapters 1 and 2)

A. You cannot run from God. (Verse 3)

It makes no difference where you go, you cannot run from God. The Psalmist said
''Though I make my bed in hell, thou art there.''

Jonah thought by running to the other end of the earth, he could get away from
God's will.

B. Sometimes your problems are consequences of disobedience. Vs.4

''But the Lord sent out a great wind on the sea and there was a mighty t ...

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