I Am My Brother's Keeper by David Cawston

I Am My Brother's Keeper
David Cawston
Genesis 4:8-14

Introduction:

In the original act of creation, God had created man for community.

He wanted man to have fellowship with Him and fellowship with each other. For God said, after the original act of creation, "It is not good for man to be alone"

He went on to create for him a spouse, family, and relationships.

As a co-ruler of the earth, God wanted him to experience the joy of companionship, fellowship, and rulership as was experienced in the Godhead itself, between the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. But because of man's fall, sin entered the picture and became the destroyer of all that possibility.

The original sin separated man from fellowship with God and put him on a course of rebellion. That course of rebellion would take its toll in the story that I read to you today. It is a picture of the increasing results of sin. Not only does separation come from God originally by Adam and Eve, but now separation comes in a family because of jealousy and rage. Cain kills Abel and mocks the face of God when God comes to asked him, Where is your brother Abel? Cain responds by saying,

Am I my brother's keeper?

As a result punishment comes to Cain as recorded in verse 11,

"Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground which opened its mouth to receive your brother's blood from your hand. When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crop for you; you will be a restless wonderer on the earth."

Separation, hardship, loneliness, fear all become a part of the results of sin. This is the second step in the process of the destruction of God's plan. God had created man for community, fellowship, and creativeness. Sin had come in and separated him from God. Now sin had separated man from man, and now family member from family member.

God would intervene through the flood to start over again through the lineage of Noah. But the propagat ...


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