Hanging In When You Want To Hang It Up (7 Of 7) by Ernest Easley

This content is part of a series.

"Hanging In When You Want to Hang It Up"
Acts 18:1-11
January 18, 1998
Dr. Ernest L. Easley

As your finding the 18th chapter of Acts I want
to ask you a question! When was the last time you
felt like quitting and giving up? Perhaps it was a job
.. teaching a Sunday School class .. your marriage ...
It's often easier to hang it up rather than to
hang in! And if there was anybody that experienced
that it was the Apostle Paul.
You will recall that Paul went on several
mission trips. When you come to chapter 18 he is
still on his second mission trip. He had just left the
city of Athens where he was alone waiting for Silas
and Timothy to join him.
Athens was the university city .. a college
town. And there he found an atmosphere of
intellectualism. There were 30,000 gods in the city of
Athens in addition to dozens of pagan philosophies.
And when Paul looked around and realized how
Satan had blinded them to superstition .. it angered
While at Athens he was called a bird brain!
Look at chapter 17.18, "Then certain Epicurean
and Stoic philosophers encountered him. And some
said, "What does this babbler want to say?" And
that word translated "babbler" literally means "seed
picker." It was used to describe a bird that would
gather a little seed over here and some over there and
throw it all together for a meal.
When they called Paul a "babbler" or a "seed
picker"... they were accusing him of gathering
theology over here and a little theology over there
and putting it all together.
Now after he preached to these intellectuals
they responded in one of three ways. Some were
Critical (v.32) ... others were Curious (v.32b) .. while
others were Converted (v.34)
Now beginning in chapter 18.1 we read,
"After these things Paul departed from Athens and
went to Corinth." You talk about wanting to hang it
up! If Athens was the city of intellectual pride . ...

There are 13264 characters in the full content. This excerpt only shows a 2000 character sample of the full content.

Price:  $4.99 or 1 credit
Sign up for a Free Trial with SermonSearch.com and download this sermon free today!