God Remembers His Mercy (9 of 9) by Ernest Easley

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God Remembers His Mercy (9 of 9)
Series: Fig Picker Turned Prophet
Ernest Easley
Amos 9:11-15

We come to the final five verses of the book of Amos! And what promising words they are! Amos has been painting a picture of doom, but suddenly, this prophet of doom becomes a prophet of delight. The victims become victors and for one reason: God remembers his mercy!

That's what I want to talk to you about as we conclude our study of the book of Amos:

As Amos concludes his book with a note of victory, I want you to briefly notice five precious promises that he declares to the people of God.

God Promises to,
(1) To Raise Up The Ruins.
v.11, ''On that day I will raise up the tabernacle of David, which as fallen down, and repair its damages; I will raise up its ruins, and rebuild it as in the days of old.'

The word translated ''tabernacle'' is literally ''tent.' It referred to an awning that was made with a frame and then they would place branches over it. It was used primarily to shelter the sun or whether. This word was used in 1 Kings 20 to describe the shelter for the watchman at his post.

And here, he's describing the dynasty of David. In other words, with just a remnant, the people of God would be restored! So, God promises to restore the nation Israel under the Davidic rule.

(1) To Raise Up the Ruins.
(2) To Possess the Remnant of Edom.

Verse 12, ''That they may possess the remnant of Edom, and all the Gentiles who are called by My name, says the Lord who does this thing.

God says, ''Here's what I'm going to do. I'm going to restore my people under Davidic rule once more so that they can possess the remnant of Edom and all the Gentiles.

When they are restored, they will possess the remnant left by Nebuchadnezzar. They would rule over the people left in Palestine.

In the New Testament day at the Jerusalem Council, James quoted these two verses in Acts 15.12-21 where he was talking about the inclusion of the Gentile ...


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