Hate Your Job? (10 of 12) by Jerry Vines

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HATE YOUR JOB? (10 of 12)
Meet Jesus
Jerry Vines
Matthew 9:9-13

I was reading an article about job dissatisfaction in
Health and Fitness Magazine this week. The article
estimated that 20 million people in America are
staying jobs they find dissatisfying. They gave a
number of signs for job dissatisfaction. They gave
some mental signs—poor concentration, boredom, and
general negative attitude. Some emotional signs of
job dissatisfaction—distress, depression,
irritability, feelings of being helpless, lonely.
Some physical signs of job dissatisfaction—restless
sleep or insomnia, weight gain or loss, tightness in
the jaw, shoulders, and neck.

Then they gave some direction of how to overcome job
dissatisfaction. 1). Find meaning and value in your
work. 2). Concentrate on working to your full
potential. 3). Give yourself what you don’t get from
others. Acknowledge your achievements. Praise. Reward
yourself for a job well done—maybe a good banana
split. 4). Don’t take what others say and do
personally. 5). Think before you act and don’t act out
of haste. 6). Listen to your body and emotions. 7).
Take needed breaks and vacations. 8). If necessary, be
willing to change jobs or careers.

We are going to study about a man today who may very
well have hated his job. I’m referring to a man named
Matthew. Matthew is indeed a man who could very well
have hated his job and when he meets the Lord Jesus
Christ, he finds the solution to his problem.

We are fairly familiar with this man Matthew. We know
that he is the author of the first book of the New
Testament—the book we are reading from this morning.
We also know that Matthew is one of the twelve
disciples. In fact, when you read in the 10th chapter
where we are given a list of the disciples, you will
notice that he refers to himself in verse 3 as
Matthew, the publican.

Sometimes when you think about those twelve disciples
that Jesus ...

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