Let's Take A Walk (16 of 36) by Jerry Vines

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LET'S TAKE A WALK (16 of 36)
Ephesians
Jerry Vines
Ephesians 4:1-6
6/7/00

We notice immediately in different tone in the way the
Apostle Paul words these particular verses. The
reason is that we have come to the major division in
the epistle to the Ephesians. It follows the
characteristic pattern of the Apostle Paul because
Paul's normal way in his epistles is to begin with
doctrine-what we believe. Then move from there and
building upon that to our duty-how we are to behave.
That's the pattern you find here in Ephesians. It is
not that doctrine teaching is not found in the rest of
the chapters, but that primarily you have here
practical application of the doctrine which has
already been revealed in these opening verses.

In the first three chapters he talks about our riches
as believers. How rich we are in the Lord. Our
spiritual riches. Now, he talks about our
responsibilities. The first three chapters he talks
about our wealth. Now he talks about our walk.

He says in verse 1, "I therefore, the prisoner of the
Lord, beseech you." that reminds you a little bit of
Romans 12:1 where it says, "I beseech you, therefore,
brethren by the mercies of God." By the way I just
want to say in passing that Paul mentions for the
second time the fact that he is a prisoner. Back in
chapter 3:1 he says, "I, Paul the prisoner of Jesus
Christ for you Gentiles." Now he says "I therefore
the prisoner of the Lord."

I prepared a message on those two verses there and the
fact of the imprisonment of Paul and what that meant.
But I think I'll just move on simply pointing out to
you that though Paul was literally physically in
prison, he does not look upon his imprisonment from
merely the literal standpoint, he puts a spiritual
application to it. "I am a prisoner of the Lord. I
am a prisoner of Jesus Christ." He is saying that he
is taking his imprisonment and using it as unto the
Lord.

M ...


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