Prone to Wander by Johnny Hunt

Prone to Wander
Johnny Hunt
James 5:19-20


INTRODUCTION: I have mentioned before how James was such a ''direct preacher'' (in your face) in presenting truth. However, I wish to begin with a more distance approach.

Practical theologian, pastor at heart.

Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing

''Come, Thou Fount of every blessing,
Tune my heart to sing Thy grace;
Streams of mercy, never ceasing,
Call for songs of loudest praise:
Teach me some melodious sonnet,
Sung by flaming tongues above;
Praise the mount-I'm fixed upon it-
Mount of Thy redeeming love.

Here I raise mine Ebenezer;
Hither by Thy help I'm come;
And I hope, by Thy good pleasure,
Safely to arrive at home:
Jesus sought me when a stranger,
Wan-d'ring from the fold of God:
He, to rescue me from danger,
Interposed His precious blood.

O to grace how great a debtor
Daily I'm constrained to be!
Let Thy goodness, like a fetter,
Bind my wan-d'ring heart to Thee:
Prone to wander, Lord, I feel it,
Prone to leave the God I love;
Here's my heart, O take and seal it,
Seal it for Thy courts above.''

Robert Robinson, author of the hymn, 'Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing,' lost the happy communion with the Savior he had once enjoyed, and in his declining years he wandered into the byways of sin. As a result, he became deeply troubled in spirit.

Hoping to relieve his mind, he decided to travel. In the course of his journeys, he became acquainted with a young woman on spiritual matters, and so she asked him what he thought of a hymn she had just been reading. To his astonishment he found it to be none other than his own composition. He tried to evade her question, but she continued to press him for a response. Suddenly he began to weep. With tears streaming down his cheeks, he said, 'I am the man who wrote that hymn many years ago. I'd give anything to experience again the joy I knew then.'

Although greatly surprised, she reassured him that the 'streams of mercy' mentione ...


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