The Tragedy Of The Almost by Jerry Vines

Acts 26:24-29
Dr. Vines 7/19/87
Three men in our passage of Scripture tonight illustrate the variety of
itudes toward the Lord Jesus Christ. Festus represents those who are
alienated from the Lord Jesus. He thought Paul was going crazy right before
his very eyes. He mistook earnestness for insanity. When the Lord Jesus was
conducting his publie ministry there were times when people thought that Jesus
was beside himself. In fact, one time the family of Jesus came and saw him
because they believed Jesus Christ had lost his mind. It's a rather
interesting thing for me to observe that people do not consider it insanity to
be all out for money. Or to be sold out for pleasure. Or to go all the way for
power. But when a man goes all the way for the Lord Jesus Christ they think
he has lost his mind. So, here is Festus. He represents those who are
alienated from Jesus Christ.
The apostle Paul represents those who are altogether for Jesus Christ.
He was 100% for Jesus. He was all out for Jesus. He was totally committed to
the Lord. Paul's philosophy of life is summarized in his words when he said,
"For to me to live is Christ and to die is gain." I don't know about you, but
I want to be in the category of Paul. I want to be altogether FOR the Lord
Jesus. I don't want anyone to question my loyalty. I would have no one to
doubt where I stand about the Lord Jesus. I want to be altogether for the Lord
Jesus Christ.
Agrippa represents those who are almost TO the Lord Jesus. Here is a man
who evidently came to the very edge of being saved. He was almost a Christian.
He was almost to the Lord Jesus. He was so very near, yet he was so very far.
He was almost a Christian and yet he was not altogether one. In the story of
Agrippa there is the story of a tragedy. I call it the tragedy of the almost.
There are many tragedies given to us in the Bible. There is the tragedy of the
nation of Israel. You remember God's purpose and God ...

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